Missing the boat?

With the news that it appears Theresa May will be triggering Article 50 on 29th March – a ‘major’ birthday and ‘wedding anniversary’, so  it seems May has a warped sense of humour perhaps? – an action of which it would appear she and her government are nowhere near ready as they have no idea of what is involved, nor have any idea of how they can achieve their stated objectives – the media seems more interested in the following:

In the preceding article I questioned whether the media was crucial to transparency in this country, commenting on twitter that it was most obviously not on past and present performance.

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How crucial is the media?

An article in Swissinfo is headed: Media ‘crucial’ in creating transparency; from which one statement is worth repeating:

The motives for working as a journalist have remained the same: to inform, research, ask critical questions and create transparency. And to entertain people – Iwan Rickenbacher, communications expert and former party manager.

Unfortunately, in the United Kingdom, journalists (with the exception of Christopher Booker) do not inform, they obviously do not know the meaning of research, they would not know a critical question if it was written out for them to ask; and thus they do not and cannot create transparency.

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So, who can save the United Kingdom?

From this article comes the question above.

However prior to providing an answer to the above, let us pose another question to Tony Blair.  What is his answer to the the Pandora’s Box he opened with his half-arsed devolution programme in 1997?

Far to often we witness politicians making decisions for political gain, which have not been thought through; and which as a consequence, in time, then create yet further problems. By the time those further problems surface those who created said problem have since vacated politics and some other poor bastard has to clear up the resultant mess left behind.

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Af(fur)ming the minutae

When minutes of a meeting are taken they should: typically describe the events of the meeting and may include a list of attendees, a statement of the issues considered by the participants, and related responses or decisions for the issues (Wikipedia).

When someone, or some ‘body’ publishes minutes it can be held that they are asserting, or affirming, that said minutes are a true reporting of that which transpired.

In February a meeting of the All Party Parliamentary Group for Animal Welfare (APGAW) was held which specifically concentrated on the ‘fur trade’; of which the minutes can be viewed here (click on meetings and events – downloads as pdf).

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I did try to tell one idiot………

A couple of years ago, it may have been three or four – I’ve been to bed since then – at a Bruges Group meeting about membership of the European Union, I harangued  the panel (whilst I forget three attendees I do distinctly recall one of them was John Redwood) stating that I had never heard so much rubbish from four people who were supposed to know that about which they had spoken (which understandably went down like the proverbial lead brick).

One of the subjects I raised was that of air travel and the current rights of airlines to fly to and from other member states, making the point that if we just left the European Union without first negotiating access to those same rights, planes to European Member States, or overflying the European Union, would in effect be grounded.

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A few thoughts of the day

It is noted today that a survey conducted in the Netherlands – one commissioned by the Bruges Group – shows that more than 50% of those taking part wish the Netherlands to follow the United Kingdom and leave the European Union.

We all know that surveys of public opinion only reflect the small minority of the population that are questioned, yet they are invariably a ‘pointer’ to the overall view of public opinion – so let us, for the sake of this article, assume that the foregoing is the case.

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Public appointments

We learned yesterday that Cressida Dick (unfortunate choice of surname) has been appointed ‘top dog’  of the Metropolitan Police Force. Mind you, where public bodies are concerned and funded by the taxpayer and over which we have no say, it is understandable if one of the qualifications to so do  is that he/she fulfills the necessity to be a ‘Richard’.

It is also known that she has ‘history’ of being in charge when things go wrong. When we look at this report one has to wonder, where her appointment today is concern,  just how decisions are made on our behalf. Just why was she ‘demoted’, which begs the question just why has she now been appointed to head the Met?

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What is the point….

…..wasting one’s time and effort complaining, unless of course, one is prepared to make time to actually attempt to right the wrong that annoys/frustrates one?

The question is posed as, lately, we have witnessed the ‘twitterati’ complaining about incumbents of the House of Lords not ‘doing their jobs (with pictures of them apparently asleep on the red benches), yet ‘pocketing’ their £300 daily allowance.

On that point two articles immediately spring to mind: one on Politics Home (no link) and the other in the Mail, repeating the content on Politics Home,  in which Baroness d’Souza relates the occasion she saw a Peer alight from a taxi, while having it wait, to dash inside the HoL – as she put it: presumably to claim his daily allowance and then dashing out to re-board his taxi.  Katie Ghose, Chief Executive of theElectoral Reform Society, was quick to condemn this incident, stating (according to Politics Home): Lets fix this broken House before the situation gets any worse – if only we could ‘fix’ the Electoral Reform Society; but I digress.

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What is sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander – unfortunately

According to the Cambridge Dictionary one definition of this saying is that it is said: to emphasize that if one person is allowed to do something or to behave in a particular way, then another person must be allowed to do that thing or behave in that way, too.

Much is made of a ‘supposed’ statement by Winston Churchill: We are with Europe but not of it; we are linked but not compromised. We are associated but not absorbed. If Britain must choose between Europe and the open sea, she must always choose the open sea.

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