Tag Archives: Democracy

Who knows what transpires behind ‘closed doors’?

With the recent resignation of a Secretary of State for Defense – for the apparent crime of ‘misbehaviour’ – and the growing ‘witch-hunt’ to discover those of his ilk who may be ‘guilty’ of similar crimes, an important question arises.

First though, let us consider a subject that is inherent in the question of ‘misbehaviour’,  where two people are concerned. When two people pledge to spend the remainder of their lives together, if the relationship is to last, then two main factors come into play; of which one is ‘trust’ and the other is ‘fidelity’. Without either, I would contend, no relationship can survive.

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Richtig oder falsch?

Just demonstrating I am learning something at German class….. the title of this post translates as correct or false.

Just had the following twitter exchange with a rather well-known blogger:

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This was followed minutes later by:

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Now either a blogger I hold in great esteem exhibits a sense of humour, or we have an admission that he acknowledges the stages of FlexCit are, indeed, in the wrong order.

Welche von diesen beiden Summen ist die richtige? (Which of the two is correct?)

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‘Catching the Crab(b)s’

Well it appears that one young lady did, while another has had one of her ‘attributes’  compared to having a similarity to  sugar.

Leaving aside any political bias, why cannot politicians, in  whom we are forced to put our trust, due to our system of democracy, not repay that trust by upholding what are perceived to be acceptable – and expected – standards of decency and behaviour?

When we view the political class it is becoming obvious that what you see is not what you get – be that what politicians say or what they ‘get up to’ behind our backs.

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Another Sop to our Faux Democracy?

It is noted that on Monday 30th October a debate is taking place in Westminster Hall to discuss whether the voting system in the United Kingdom should be changed to one of proportional representation (PR), as a result of a petition securing the required number of signatures.

At the 2017 general election, the Conservatives picked up 13.6 million votes and 318 seats, whereas the Liberal Democrats picked up 2.3 million votes and just 12 seats in the Commons. Combined, the Greens and Ukip collected more than 1.1 million votes but won just a single MP between them (source).

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Like many, I question the intent of those who ‘govern’ us

When the referendum question was posed in 2016, the question on the ballot paper was: Should the United Kingdom remain a member of the European Union or leave the European Union. Nowhere on the ballot paper, nor in the question, was it posed whether we should leave the Single Market.

Following a campaign run by both the Leave and Remain sides, a campaign based on lies and misinformation, we are now in the hands of a group of politicians, some of whom voted to remain. They have conflated, through their ignorance – or maybe deliberately – the question how leaving the European Union can be accomplished. In so doing  they have confused leaving the political part of the European Union with the trading part of the European Union – again, possibly with deliberate intent.

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Is May ’owen’ Paterson, or is Paterson ‘owen’ May?

Regular readers of Witterings from Witney, who have followed me to Seaham, will recall I am partial to the odd pun or two. Consequently, for any new readers, I ‘translate’ the heading to this article, bearing in mind that our ‘ever-knowing’ (not) media have their finger on the pulse of important news in their reporting that ‘Our Revered (not) Leader’ is planning a cabinet reshuffle.

In view of the foregoing, the question has to be asked whether she is ‘owing’ Paterson a ‘return to government ‘ for his undoubted allegiance to her ‘programme’; or he thinks she is ‘owing’ him a ‘return to government’ for ‘promoting’ her ‘programme’ – albeit her ‘programme’ is a load of crap (of which more shortly).

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Spending other people’s money

That is dead easy, especially if the other people have no real say on the matter and they are not informed of the true cost of a programme it is intended be implemented.

First, though, a little digression. Angela Raynor: When I became pregnant at sixteen……  (source). Well Ms Raynor, had your mother and you had a good education, you would have  known, at 16 years of age it is a good idea, to be quite blunt, if girls kept their legs closed.

Sure Start: a programme with the aim of “giving children the best possible start in life” through improvement of childcare, early education, health and family support, with an emphasis on outreach and community development (source). When standards of education has been reduced to the point where public money is being wasted; and  has so been done over decades purely for political idealogy, is it any wonder that parents do not have, or seem to have, any idea abut ‘parenting’, coupled with children being taught about ‘personal responsibility’?

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Being ‘taken for a ride’

We either live by democracy or we do not, we either follow the will of the people or we perish.

Wherever one cares to look we, the people, are being taken for the ‘proverbial ride’; especially where democracy per se is concerned. At this early point it is necessary to, once again,define the word ‘democracy’. It is derived from the Greek: ‘Demos’; People; ‘Kratos’: Power – People Power. If the ‘people’ do not have the  power to control their elected ‘representatives’, then it must follow that there can be no ‘democracy per se’.

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Therein lies the problem

I note that Oliver Norgrove has recently had two articles in the MSM; one in the Daily Telegraph and t’other in the Guardian. As a Senior Citizen, of some seniority now, I feel able to state that I have been following the writings of ‘young Norgrove’ for some time; and as a result, hold him in high regard.

In his article for the Guardian he writes that he is tempted to vote for Labour in view of the intransigence of the Conservatives for a ‘Hard Brexit’. He writes: The result of all this is that I’m likely to vote Labour at the next general election. I have soured against a Tory party that is extremely close to wrecking a political endeavour I will defend until my dying day……But in all this there is opportunity: to switch tack and opt for pursuit of European Free Trade Association membership, as advocated by the Efta president, Carl Baudenbacher. If Labour was to do so, they could highlight the absurd hypocrisy in the Tories claiming to be the party of economic strength whilst they drive us unnervingly towards a cliff edge. It’s a move that would attract huge support in more metropolitan and remain-supporting pockets of the country – precisely the areas Labour will need to appeal to if it is to have a chance of a majority at the next election. Business will also take note, bewildered at the very real prospects of a default no deal or stunted trade flow that a Tory Brexit might cause. The Norway option is Labour’s chance to restore public faith in its capacity to build a strong economy.

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The ‘Mind Benders’

When the referendum last year was confirmed, from then (if not before) all we have had from our politicians and the commentariat was crap; crap in that they knew not what they were talking and/or writing about (and still haven’t).

The latest crap we are being fed is from Labour who want a transitional deal which includes continued participation of the Single Market and continued membership of the Customs Union. This has dutifully been hailed by the Financial Times as: the best news to come out of British politics in a long time and putting Labour: many steps ahead of the Conservatives. Both the statements from Labour and the Financial Times have one thing in common: they are both crap; but hey, we are supposed to believe them because they emanate from two supposedly reliable sources.

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