Tag Archives: Democracy

Being ‘taken for a ride’

We either live by democracy or we do not, we either follow the will of the people or we perish.

Wherever one cares to look we, the people, are being taken for the ‘proverbial ride’; especially where democracy per se is concerned. At this early point it is necessary to, once again,define the word ‘democracy’. It is derived from the Greek: ‘Demos’; People; ‘Kratos’: Power – People Power. If the ‘people’ do not have the  power to control their elected ‘representatives’, then it must follow that there can be no ‘democracy per se’.

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Therein lies the problem

I note that Oliver Norgrove has recently had two articles in the MSM; one in the Daily Telegraph and t’other in the Guardian. As a Senior Citizen, of some seniority now, I feel able to state that I have been following the writings of ‘young Norgrove’ for some time; and as a result, hold him in high regard.

In his article for the Guardian he writes that he is tempted to vote for Labour in view of the intransigence of the Conservatives for a ‘Hard Brexit’. He writes: The result of all this is that I’m likely to vote Labour at the next general election. I have soured against a Tory party that is extremely close to wrecking a political endeavour I will defend until my dying day……But in all this there is opportunity: to switch tack and opt for pursuit of European Free Trade Association membership, as advocated by the Efta president, Carl Baudenbacher. If Labour was to do so, they could highlight the absurd hypocrisy in the Tories claiming to be the party of economic strength whilst they drive us unnervingly towards a cliff edge. It’s a move that would attract huge support in more metropolitan and remain-supporting pockets of the country – precisely the areas Labour will need to appeal to if it is to have a chance of a majority at the next election. Business will also take note, bewildered at the very real prospects of a default no deal or stunted trade flow that a Tory Brexit might cause. The Norway option is Labour’s chance to restore public faith in its capacity to build a strong economy.

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The ‘Mind Benders’

When the referendum last year was confirmed, from then (if not before) all we have had from our politicians and the commentariat was crap; crap in that they knew not what they were talking and/or writing about (and still haven’t).

The latest crap we are being fed is from Labour who want a transitional deal which includes continued participation of the Single Market and continued membership of the Customs Union. This has dutifully been hailed by the Financial Times as: the best news to come out of British politics in a long time and putting Labour: many steps ahead of the Conservatives. Both the statements from Labour and the Financial Times have one thing in common: they are both crap; but hey, we are supposed to believe them because they emanate from two supposedly reliable sources.

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Do politicians have a ‘shelf life’?

I ask the question in view of this article.

Long ago I lost count of:

  • politicians dismissed from cabinet owing to misdemeanors, incompetence, or ‘rebellion’; only to be re-appointed a few years later;
  • politicians dismissed from cabinet and then jumping on a bandwagon of their leader, hoping for re-appointment;
  • politicians dismissed from cabinet by the preceding prime minister, yet are re-appointed by the successor purely to keep them ‘on-side’ so that they do not cause ‘trouble.
  • politicians with a degree in Politics,  Philosophy and Economics (PPE) appointed to cabinet posts for which they had no firsthand work experience.

Rosamund Irwin, the author of the linked article above, is quite correct to write that Theresa May leads a cabinet of the ‘resurrected and recycled’; but then what prime ministerial practice, within his/her tenure at No 10, has she not followed for her own benefit?

In a separate article Sebastian Whale asks when did we stop trying to understand each other. Sebastian ‘wails’ abut the lack of co-operation twixt politicians of opposing political views – yet never mind political party discourse, just when have they actually ‘talked’ to us?. Yes, politicians may well talk to each other, but more likely their topic of conversation is more to do with leaders of their party who they consider idiots or possibly the inflated prices in their  subsidised restaurants. Yes, he mentions Stella Creasy’s amendment to the Queen’s Speech that allowed Northern Irish women to access abortions on the NHS in mainland Britain, supported by whip-defying Tory MPs and a cause long championed by among others, Conservative chair of the Equalities Committee, Maria Miller; but how more quickly might that have been introduced if those people it affected had had a voice in the matter?

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Ignorance is bliss

‘Ignorance is bliss’ is a phrase coined by Thomas Gray in his Ode on a Distant Prospect of Eton College; a poem in which he nostalgically reminisces about the bliss of youth with its carefree days of playfulness unmarred by the dark realities of adult life and the responsibilities thereof (and there are suggestions that the voting age should be lowered even further – but I digress). In fact, never mind the foregoing digression, it would appear  that present day politicians are to a man – regardless of age and sex – still in the bliss of youth and consequently have yet to reach the dark realities of adulthood; but yet again I digress.

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The state will provide………

Or so we have been brought up to believe – in which case we must all now believe in fairies. In our belief in fairies we have lost sight of the fact that the world in which such a Utopia does not – and cannot – logically exist. To those who say: ‘I want’ – or: ‘I am entitled’, did not Thomas Sowell say:  Since this is an era when many people are concerned about ‘fairness’ and ‘social justice,’ what is your ‘fair share’ of what someone else has worked for? (think those who voted for Corbyn’s ‘promised’ ‘abolition of student loans’?

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Palace of Westminster: Renovation

We are informed that £billions needs to be spent on renovating the Palace of Westminster; a renovation programme which could last up to 40  years and cost more than £7bn, according to a comprehensive official report. We are also informed, by the Palace of Westminster website, that the Restoration and Renewal Programme has been established to tackle the significant work that needs to be done to protect the heritage of the Palace of Westminster and ensure it can continue to serve as home to the UK Parliament in the 21st century and beyond.

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Frustration at those who are ignorant

Readers may have noticed that output on this blog has been, shall we say, minimal of late. This is probably due to my fatigue at repeating content that has been posted previously and a realization that repetition becomes boring to readers.

However something on twitter caught my eye; namely this, which includes my response:

to which I added this further comment:

I mention the above as, in talking to someone this evening, the suggestion was made that should the current government make a ‘pigs ear’ of Brexit, it would be then necessary to begin all over again – which may well mean that Stage 1 and Stage 6 of FlexCit will make it necessary to combine the two in order to arrive at the decision for which the people voted in June last year – said combination which is sommat for which I have argued since its inception; indeed,  maintaining in the process, that Stage 6 should have been Stage 1.

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Missing the point

When reviewing the output of our media, it is necessary to ask oneself on just what planet they live.

Without ‘trawling’ the media output – be that the BBC, ITV, Sky, or any of the newspapers, a snapshot can be found on Politics Home which advertises itself on Google as providing: all the latest political news, opinion, interviews and analysis from Westminster, Whitehall and beyond – of which, today, comprises this. This example is no different to any other day where Politics Home is concerned and but mirrors that of every other news outlet dealing with what are supposed to be: ‘matters du jour’.

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Agenda(s) – and ‘Stitch-Up’ of Democracy (2)

Following on from the preceding article, we today find yet another example of our politicians, in this case those in government, arranging a deal with another political party so that (a) the current largest party can remain in power and (b) a minor party gets a taste of holding the levers of power; the latter having agreed themselves a ‘bung’ in the process.

This ‘deal’ involves, so it is reported, £1.5bn of taxpayers money; and it has been agreed without any involvement of those who will be ‘footing the bill’. What kind of society is it that allows a portion of their hard-earned income to be spent (and increased) by a political clique over whom those that will be ‘footing the bill’ have had no say?

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