Tag Archives: Direct Democracy

The ‘Mind Benders’

When the referendum last year was confirmed, from then (if not before) all we have had from our politicians and the commentariat was crap; crap in that they knew not what they were talking and/or writing about (and still haven’t).

The latest crap we are being fed is from Labour who want a transitional deal which includes continued participation of the Single Market and continued membership of the Customs Union. This has dutifully been hailed by the Financial Times as: the best news to come out of British politics in a long time and putting Labour: many steps ahead of the Conservatives. Both the statements from Labour and the Financial Times have one thing in common: they are both crap; but hey, we are supposed to believe them because they emanate from two supposedly reliable sources.

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Do politicians have a ‘shelf life’?

I ask the question in view of this article.

Long ago I lost count of:

  • politicians dismissed from cabinet owing to misdemeanors, incompetence, or ‘rebellion’; only to be re-appointed a few years later;
  • politicians dismissed from cabinet and then jumping on a bandwagon of their leader, hoping for re-appointment;
  • politicians dismissed from cabinet by the preceding prime minister, yet are re-appointed by the successor purely to keep them ‘on-side’ so that they do not cause ‘trouble.
  • politicians with a degree in Politics,  Philosophy and Economics (PPE) appointed to cabinet posts for which they had no firsthand work experience.

Rosamund Irwin, the author of the linked article above, is quite correct to write that Theresa May leads a cabinet of the ‘resurrected and recycled’; but then what prime ministerial practice, within his/her tenure at No 10, has she not followed for her own benefit?

In a separate article Sebastian Whale asks when did we stop trying to understand each other. Sebastian ‘wails’ abut the lack of co-operation twixt politicians of opposing political views – yet never mind political party discourse, just when have they actually ‘talked’ to us?. Yes, politicians may well talk to each other, but more likely their topic of conversation is more to do with leaders of their party who they consider idiots or possibly the inflated prices in their  subsidised restaurants. Yes, he mentions Stella Creasy’s amendment to the Queen’s Speech that allowed Northern Irish women to access abortions on the NHS in mainland Britain, supported by whip-defying Tory MPs and a cause long championed by among others, Conservative chair of the Equalities Committee, Maria Miller; but how more quickly might that have been introduced if those people it affected had had a voice in the matter?

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Adulthood

 When I was a child, I spake as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child: but when I became a man, I put away childish things.
1 Corinthians 13:11

Unfortunately, to our cost, this does not appear to apply to our political class, the commentariat and the media. Those three groups have the power, due to their position in our society, to formulate the minds of the people in our land.

When adults would have us believe that they are the font of all knowledge – and aren’t – then is it any wonder the people are uninformed on important matters? That is not to say the people are blameless – and in their defense it must be pointed out that they have been educated to believe the state will look after them, ‘come what may’ (pun intended), with knowledgeable guidance.

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Manchester -a personal statement.

The recent event in Manchester resulting in the death of 22 people and the injury of some 50+ more, some of whom were children, is, of course, not only sad; but also sickening.

Sickening not just because of what occurred, but sickening as a result of the platitudes offered by those who bear the responsibility for having created the conditions which allowed it happened.

Statements such as: our prayers and thoughts are with those bereaved; we will not allow terrorism to win; those complicit in the act will be brought to justice; Manchester will ‘come together’ and be stronger; a public vigil will be held in their memory, etc, etc, are meaningless  to those who died or were injured – or their families.

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From cradle to grave – what are the benefits?

In the United Kingdom we are repeatedly informed the NHS is there to care for us from cradle to grave, yet all we read about is the ‘alleged’ shortage of cash that the NHS suffers coupled with waiting times in A&E and admissions to wards. One has to ask why politicians have allowed what has become an ‘institution’, an institution of their own making, to be still treated by them all as a ‘sacred cow’.

At its inception it was never intended to cater for the patient numbers that now exist. Why those numbers exist today  can basically be laid at the door of immigration together with the increased longevity of life, but, more importantly, also at the door of politicians who have done nothing to mitigate the situation in which the NHS now finds itself.

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People of the United Kingdom, we are well and truly ‘procreated’!

Well may you ask where the fault lies.

Sometimes I think that a parody of democracy could be more dangerous than a blatant dictatorship, because that gives people an opportunity to avoid doing anything about it. Aung San Suu Kyi Discerning the difference between a dictator and a leader is quite easy. The former cannot help but see ‘leading’ and ‘serving’ as stark contradictions that by their very nature are utterly incompatible. The latter can’t tell the difference Craig D. Lounsbrough

When a nation leaves the fate of his country to an ignorant and fool person, then that nation itself will be remembered in history as an ignorant and fool nation!”
Mehmet Murat ildan

From Wikipedia we learn that: Dictatorship is a form of government where a country or a group of countries is ruled by one person or political entity, and exercised through various mechanisms to ensure that the entity’s power remains strong. A dictatorship is a type of authoritarianism, in which politicians regulate nearly every aspect of the public and private behavior of citizens. Dictatorship and totalitarianism societies generally employ political propaganda to decrease the influence of proponents of alternative governing systems.

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What is sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander – unfortunately

According to the Cambridge Dictionary one definition of this saying is that it is said: to emphasize that if one person is allowed to do something or to behave in a particular way, then another person must be allowed to do that thing or behave in that way, too.

Much is made of a ‘supposed’ statement by Winston Churchill: We are with Europe but not of it; we are linked but not compromised. We are associated but not absorbed. If Britain must choose between Europe and the open sea, she must always choose the open sea.

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Naturalisation

When a foreign national seeks citizenship/naturalisaton of their host nation, who should make that decision – those of the community in which the applicant lives; or, as in the United Kingdom, a bureaucratic, box-ticking government department?

Recently, in Switzerland, a case concerning a woman who had lived in Switzerland since she was eight, speaks fluent Swiss German, has three children with Swiss passports, has no criminal record, doesn’t claim welfare and is politically active was rejected. On the face of it, one would have thought she would be a ‘shoo-in’ for a Swiss passport. How wrong you are..

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Home Truths – a new series

Having been for some time a disciple of Thomas Sowell, an American economist, turned social theorist, political philosopher, and author; I thought I might start a new daily series, using his ‘pithy’ remarks (some of which may end up being paraphrased to make them pertinent to this country.

#! – A question for politicians:

Since this is an era when many of you are concerned about ‘fairness’ and ‘social justice,’ what is your ‘fair share’ of what someone else has worked for?

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The Political Mindset

Even though his political affiliation/thinking is at the opposite spectrum to mine, I have (until now) always ‘had time’ for Frank Field (Labour – Birkenhead).

In a  recent interview he gave to Sky News on the subject of Parliamentary Democracy viz-a-viz Brexit, he said:

When we decide to have a referendum, we give back to the people that sovereignty – they decide the issue………… (emphasis mine)

So presumably, under representative democracy, the people have no sovereignty unless the political elite allow them so to have for the fifteen hours that polling booths are open. This point was noted by Jean-Jacques Rousseau (28 June 1712 – 2 July 1778) who is reported to have said: The English think they are free. They are free only during the election of members of parliament.

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