Tag Archives: Politicians

There, is the problem

A few days ago I was sent this link, with the comment that it was thought this summary of where the world ‘is at’ very good and has a certain resonance to the THA as the quote from the article: You cannot influence people to volunteer for servitude and submission unless they are sufficiently terrified of the alternativ shows.

I replied that: While I can, to a certain extent, agree with the thrust of the article you quote, I fail to see any resonance with THA. The only alternative to servitude and submission must surely be direct democracy, so how can people be terrified by that?

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British politics at its finest – or lowest?

It is assumed by all and sundry. especially other so-called democracies, that the weekly session known as Prime Minister’s Questions (PMQs) demonstrates the British political system ‘at its best’; in that ordinary  Members of Parliament, ie those not ‘holding an office’ of some description, have the opportunity to ask the Leader of the Government of the day any question they wish. This ability to so do is believed to be an example of democracy in action.

How little those that envy the British system actually know.

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When do MP’s speak their mind?

Jess Phillips – Labour: Birmingham Yardley – has an article in the Guardian, one entitled: Jo Cox’s murder has left us MPs more fearful to speak our minds with a sub-heading: Online hatred, abuse and threats of violence to force politicians – female ones especially – to sing to a certain tune will be the death of our democracy.

Her article begins: Recently, I was in one of my weekly surgeries giving advice to local constituents when a man who was in a state of some distress leaned down to get something out of a holdall. I began to panic. It might be irrational, but since Jo Cox was murdered I have this feeling frequently. This week a local church called about my annual address at the Christmas carol concert. Every year I do a reading, never before have they called and asked me if they need to arrange a discreet police presence for my safety.

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The right to rule?

It would seem that those we elect rely on a mistaken belief, based on ‘Parliamentary Democracy’, that they alone have the ‘right to rule’ the people of the United Kingdom. This allows them to believe that, through the system of representative democracy, they ‘own’ the United Kingdom based on the idea they represent the people of the United Kingdom – which they most definitely do not.

While one sees MPs such as David Lammy stating he will vote against triggering Article 50 come what may  and Owen Smith openly stating he will use any vote in an attempt to get another referendum to overthrow the result of the first; no way can MPs maintain they represent the views of the people. It is then the question has to be asked: wherefore democracy?

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Self-loathing politicians

Isabel Hardman writes in the Speccie, asking: Why are politicians so self-loathing? She berates a politician, in this case Dan Jarvis, for suggesting that something needs the politics taking out of it. thus implying that politics in itself is inherently a bad thing and that politicians can never be trusted.

In so doing she quotes Jarvis: Let’s be honest – MPs who represent areas along the HS2 route or in the Heathrow flight path have a tough call about whether to vote for these schemes. So let’s take out the politics. Let’s look at new powers that allow the government to refer major infrastructure decisions to the National Infrastructure Commission for an independent decision on whether projects should go ahead.

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The people are mere ‘spectators’

Where the forthcoming referendum is concerned, the title of this article has never been truer. The latest ‘tittle-tattle’ that journalism has produced is the offering from James Forsyth in the Speccie Coffee House blog.

Just why does either ‘campaign’ need to be led by a political figure or anyone connected with the establishment? Just when will journalists recognise and accept that the whole idea of a referendum is that it is supposed to be the people’s choice – and in order for them to make that choice all they need is the facts pro and anti membership of the EU? Just when will journalists, in pushing for one ‘campaign’ or another, be ‘open’and in the case of Forsyth admit that the commissioning editor of his article is married to the campaign director of Vote_Leave?

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Uniform Krap Information Party – aka Ukip

Jill Seymour, Ukip MEP, has published this on her website under the headline: First vacuum cleaners, now the EU targets oven gloves! In the article she castigates the European Commission,writing: I think it is ridiculous that oven gloves will now be subject to the same safety checks that Hard Hats and Safety Goggles go through; adding: Forcing businesses who manufacture oven gloves to go through this extra level of bureaucracy is ridiculous, this will add an extra cost to the manufacturing process and ultimately it will be the public who will have to pay, as businesses cannot afford to absorb these extra costs.

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Try looking in a mirror, Iain

Iain Martin, writing on CapX, bemoans the inability of the press to question politicians during  the current general election; especially at stage-managed public appearances, whilst complaining bitterly that morning press conferences are now a thing of the past with only Ukip continuing to provide such events.

Martin’s article poses the question: why is the British media so supine in the face of control from the big parties – but has not the British media been so for ages? When journalists are allowed to question political figures, such questions that are asked are poor to say the least. 

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The Leader’s Debates

Yesterday at Prime Ministers  Questions Ed Miliband attempted to ‘pin down’ Cameron on a head-to-head debate between the two of them (starts @37:50) – that Cameron refused to answer was a surprise (not). No doubt the media will work itself into a frenzy on this issue – but then the media are renowned for dealing in tittle-tattle; and the Leaders Debates are just that: tittle-tattle.

In any event it would not be surprising were the Liberal Democrats to attempt to gain an injunction against such a head-to-head on the basis they were thus denied the opportunity to defend themselves against any accusations that either Cameron or Miliband made about them; coupled with the fact they are unable to question that which both Cameron and Miliband may say on ‘issues du jour’.

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Mediocrity

Some people are born mediocre, some people achieve mediocrity, and some people have mediocrity thrust upon them.
Joseph Heller

George Parker, writing in the Financial Times, reports that David Cameron is being urged to appoint a full-time lead negotiator in order to secure his proposed new deal for Britain in the EU. The person behind this suggestion is David Frost; who was, until recently, the UK’s most senior trade diplomat, as Director for Europe, Trade and International Affairs at the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills. Frost’s ‘paper’, one entitled: Gearing up for delivery, How to manage the renegotiation (produced by Open Europe), can be read here.

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