Tag Archives: Politicians

The ‘Mind Benders’

When the referendum last year was confirmed, from then (if not before) all we have had from our politicians and the commentariat was crap; crap in that they knew not what they were talking and/or writing about (and still haven’t).

The latest crap we are being fed is from Labour who want a transitional deal which includes continued participation of the Single Market and continued membership of the Customs Union. This has dutifully been hailed by the Financial Times as: the best news to come out of British politics in a long time and putting Labour: many steps ahead of the Conservatives. Both the statements from Labour and the Financial Times have one thing in common: they are both crap; but hey, we are supposed to believe them because they emanate from two supposedly reliable sources.

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Palace of Westminster: Renovation

We are informed that £billions needs to be spent on renovating the Palace of Westminster; a renovation programme which could last up to 40  years and cost more than £7bn, according to a comprehensive official report. We are also informed, by the Palace of Westminster website, that the Restoration and Renewal Programme has been established to tackle the significant work that needs to be done to protect the heritage of the Palace of Westminster and ensure it can continue to serve as home to the UK Parliament in the 21st century and beyond.

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As the pipers, should we not call the tune?

(Source)

Yet more platitudinous crap from one who vies to be this nation’s next prime minister.

The British people may well be united in their resolve that terror will not prevail, however it is a great pity that our politicians, of which the originator of this statement is one, do not have the resolve to provide that on which the British people are undoubtedly intent.

If only we could resume democratic debate, but when have we had that? How can we have that when the leaders of political parties hold carefully stage-managed rallies which are packed with their party faithful?

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From cradle to grave – what are the benefits?

In the United Kingdom we are repeatedly informed the NHS is there to care for us from cradle to grave, yet all we read about is the ‘alleged’ shortage of cash that the NHS suffers coupled with waiting times in A&E and admissions to wards. One has to ask why politicians have allowed what has become an ‘institution’, an institution of their own making, to be still treated by them all as a ‘sacred cow’.

At its inception it was never intended to cater for the patient numbers that now exist. Why those numbers exist today  can basically be laid at the door of immigration together with the increased longevity of life, but, more importantly, also at the door of politicians who have done nothing to mitigate the situation in which the NHS now finds itself.

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There, is the problem

A few days ago I was sent this link, with the comment that it was thought this summary of where the world ‘is at’ very good and has a certain resonance to the THA as the quote from the article: You cannot influence people to volunteer for servitude and submission unless they are sufficiently terrified of the alternativ shows.

I replied that: While I can, to a certain extent, agree with the thrust of the article you quote, I fail to see any resonance with THA. The only alternative to servitude and submission must surely be direct democracy, so how can people be terrified by that?

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British politics at its finest – or lowest?

It is assumed by all and sundry. especially other so-called democracies, that the weekly session known as Prime Minister’s Questions (PMQs) demonstrates the British political system ‘at its best’; in that ordinary  Members of Parliament, ie those not ‘holding an office’ of some description, have the opportunity to ask the Leader of the Government of the day any question they wish. This ability to so do is believed to be an example of democracy in action.

How little those that envy the British system actually know.

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When do MP’s speak their mind?

Jess Phillips – Labour: Birmingham Yardley – has an article in the Guardian, one entitled: Jo Cox’s murder has left us MPs more fearful to speak our minds with a sub-heading: Online hatred, abuse and threats of violence to force politicians – female ones especially – to sing to a certain tune will be the death of our democracy.

Her article begins: Recently, I was in one of my weekly surgeries giving advice to local constituents when a man who was in a state of some distress leaned down to get something out of a holdall. I began to panic. It might be irrational, but since Jo Cox was murdered I have this feeling frequently. This week a local church called about my annual address at the Christmas carol concert. Every year I do a reading, never before have they called and asked me if they need to arrange a discreet police presence for my safety.

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The right to rule?

It would seem that those we elect rely on a mistaken belief, based on ‘Parliamentary Democracy’, that they alone have the ‘right to rule’ the people of the United Kingdom. This allows them to believe that, through the system of representative democracy, they ‘own’ the United Kingdom based on the idea they represent the people of the United Kingdom – which they most definitely do not.

While one sees MPs such as David Lammy stating he will vote against triggering Article 50 come what may  and Owen Smith openly stating he will use any vote in an attempt to get another referendum to overthrow the result of the first; no way can MPs maintain they represent the views of the people. It is then the question has to be asked: wherefore democracy?

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Self-loathing politicians

Isabel Hardman writes in the Speccie, asking: Why are politicians so self-loathing? She berates a politician, in this case Dan Jarvis, for suggesting that something needs the politics taking out of it. thus implying that politics in itself is inherently a bad thing and that politicians can never be trusted.

In so doing she quotes Jarvis: Let’s be honest – MPs who represent areas along the HS2 route or in the Heathrow flight path have a tough call about whether to vote for these schemes. So let’s take out the politics. Let’s look at new powers that allow the government to refer major infrastructure decisions to the National Infrastructure Commission for an independent decision on whether projects should go ahead.

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The people are mere ‘spectators’

Where the forthcoming referendum is concerned, the title of this article has never been truer. The latest ‘tittle-tattle’ that journalism has produced is the offering from James Forsyth in the Speccie Coffee House blog.

Just why does either ‘campaign’ need to be led by a political figure or anyone connected with the establishment? Just when will journalists recognise and accept that the whole idea of a referendum is that it is supposed to be the people’s choice – and in order for them to make that choice all they need is the facts pro and anti membership of the EU? Just when will journalists, in pushing for one ‘campaign’ or another, be ‘open’and in the case of Forsyth admit that the commissioning editor of his article is married to the campaign director of Vote_Leave?

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